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NEUROLEADERSHIP ARTICLES


  • Memory Capacity is TEN TIMES MORE Than Previously Thought
    Post published by Dr. Jeremy Dean, PsyBlog
    A human brain could hold as much information as the entire internet, a new study finds. Human memory capacity is in the petabyte range, researchers at the Salk Institute have now found.This is ten times larger than was previously thought.

  • How to Know if Your're Working with Mammals or Reptiles (and Why it Matters to your Creativity)
    Post published by
    Drake Baer

    You’ve got millions of years of evolution rattling around in your nervous system. When you put it in an office, mammalian and reptilian traits emerge. Neurophysiologist Stephen Porges explains how to detect each behavior. Which is why if you’re doing creative work—the kind that thrives on connecting people and ideas—you should be working in a safe, "mammalian" office. As Porges says, "we really are not creative and integrative and social unless we feel safe." The earlier, reptilian parts of our nervous system are adapted to a solitary, risk-filled world—reptiles are, after all, loners. So that part of us is on constant lookout.
  • Never Pass up the Chance to have Lunch with a Neuroscientist
    A conversation with Dr. Carlos Davidovich on Neuromanagement and how understanding the workings of the brain can help people take on new mindsets and behaviours that lead to greater performance.

  • How to Know if Your're Working with Mammals or Reptiles (and Why it Matters to your Creativity)
    Post published by
    Drake Baer

    You’ve got millions of years of evolution rattling around in your nervous system. When you put it in an office, mammalian and reptilian traits emerge. Neurophysiologist Stephen Porges explains how to detect each behavior. Which is why if you’re doing creative work—the kind that thrives on connecting people and ideas—you should be working in a safe, "mammalian" office. As Porges says, "we really are not creative and integrative and social unless we feel safe." The earlier, reptilian parts of our nervous system are adapted to a solitary, risk-filled world—reptiles are, after all, loners. So that part of us is on constant lookout.
  • The Valuable Data in Your Gut
    Post published by
    Daniel Goleman
    The best business decisions take into account all the numbers and facts on the table, and then something from beyond the table: the brain’s total understanding of a deal. This requires that we tune into brain circuitry that manages our entire life wisdom on the subject. The tricky part: none of this circuitry connects to the part of the brain that thinks in words. It connects largely to the gastrointestinal tract. Specifically, we need to sense our gut feeling. A study done at USC found that when highly successful entrepreneurs make decisions, they gather information as widely as possible, then check it against their gut sense. If it doesn’t feel right, they won’t go ahead, even if the numbers look good.
  • Purpose in Life Leads to a Longer Life: Now We Ask... Why?
    Post published by Maclen Stanley on Jul 31, 2014 in Making Sense of Chaos.
    Purpose maintains both psychological and physical homeostasis by recentering one's conscious attention towards a more prospective focus, causing everyday stressors to become less influential in the manufacturing of health and well-being. Patients with a sense of purpose experience less negative moods when recovering from surgery and also that purpose is a protective factor in myocardial infarctions (which can be an indicator of stress).
  • What can mirror neurons teach us about consciousness, mental health and well-being?
    By William T. O’Connor
      - Article published on Inside the Brain, September 2013.

    The study of mirror neurons is converging to unite the emerging scientific study of consciousness with the field of cybernetics, to bridge the gap between the mechanistic models of brain function, with the knowledge of ourselves as a lot more than just our brains.
  • Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain
    By Daniel J. Levitin
      - Article published in The New York Times, August 2014.

    Beware the false vacation break. Make sure you have a real one. The summer vacation is more than a quaint tradition. Along with family time, mealtime and weekends, it is an important way that we can make the most of our beautiful brains.
  • Hearts, Guts and Minds, How our Multiple Brains Make for Great Leaders
    By Carlos Davidovich, M.D., MBA, Vice President, Executive Coaching, Optimum Talent and Suzanne Hood, Ph.D.
      - Article published in the HR Professional Magazine, July/August 2014.

    In our current age of rapid change, strong leadership skills have never been more valuable. Many words come to mind when thinking of an ideal leader: rational, logical, decisive, single-minded. But how true is this ideal image?
  • The Neuroscience of Vitality, Tip #2: Mirror Neurons
    By Eva Ritvo, M.D., Best-selling author and Psychiatrist.
    - Article published in Psychology Today, July 2014.

    As a practicing psychiatrist, I have gathered my top seven neuroscience tips for vitality that have proven to be useful for virtually all of my patients, and I am eager to share them with you. Today, in my second vitality tip, you'll learn how to wield the power of mirror neurons.
  • Demystifying Neuroleadership: Creating Inspiring and Collaborative Environments
    By Jacqueline Codsi, M.Ps.org., CRIA, ASC and Nathalie Langis, M. Sc. CRHA, Vice President and practice leader, Career Management, Optimum Talent.
    - Article published in Le coin de l’expert of the HRPA, May 2013.

    NeuroLeadership enables organizations the decisive factors that create inspiring and collaborative environments, while simultaneously avoiding poor morale and apathy that so often results in the loss of talent and high turnover in organizations.
  • Myth of Multitasking
    By Jim Taylor, Ph.D.
    - Article published in Psychology Today, March 2011.

    For everyone who thinks they're maximizing their time by texting while driving, or posting Tweets while compiling sales data in another window, cognitive scientists beg to differ. Multitasking isn't just ineffective, it can be dangerous.
  • SCaRF®: a brain-based model for collaborating with and influencing others
    By Dr. David Rock, Co-founder, Neuroleadership Institute.
    - Article published in the Neuroleadership Journal, 2008.

    In a world of increasing interconnectedness and rapid change, there is a growing need to improve the way people work together.Understanding the true drivers of human social behavior is becoming ever more urgent in this environment.
  • SCaRF® in 2012: updating the social neuroscience of collaborating with others
    By Dr. David Rock, Co-founder, NeuroLeadership Institute and Christine Cox, Ph.D.
    - Article published in the Neuroleadership Journal, 2012.
    The SCaRF® model stands for Status, Certainty, autonomy, Relatedness and Fairness. SCaRF defines the five domains of experience that activate strong threats and rewards in the brain, thus influencing a wide range of human behaviors.
  • Managing with the Brain in Mind
    By Dr. David Rock, Co-founder, Neuroleadership Institute.
    - Article published in Strategy+Business, issue 56, Autumn 2009.

    Neuroscience research is revealing the social nature of the high-performance workplace.
  • Neuroleadership: One Step Forward
    By Carlos Davidovich, M.D., MBA, Vice President, Executive Coaching, Optimum Talent.
    - Article published in june 2012.

    Our “emotional brain” has been with us for millions of years. On the other hand, our “rational brain”, as we know it now, has only been with us for 40,000 years. Our emotions still play a key role in our behaviour and in our interaction with the external world, with other people or with situations in general.
  • 3 Neuroscience Secrets For Persuasive Marketing
    Par Nathalie Nahai, Web Psychologist and best-selling author of Webs of Influence: The Psychology of Online Persuasion.
    - Article published in Psychology Today, April 2014.

    Want your marketing to be more effective? 3 neuroscience facts you need to know.
  • Mad Men Meets Neuroscience
    By Paul J. Zak, Ph.D. et Neuroeconomist.
    - Article published in Psychology Today, April 2014.

    Ninety-nine percent of what our brains do is unconscious. As a result, asking people what they like or why they’re taking a particular action provides little information of value.It’s not that people lie; rather, we simply don’t know why we do what we do—an important insight for any company that has turned to advertising to try to stimulate customer interest in its products or services.